Plant Guides: Helenium

French Name: L’hélénie

I remember my parents having great swathes of Helenium dotted around our back garden when I was growing up. Perhaps it’s for this reason or because my Gran always had them displayed in vases during the summer months, that for me they have a somewhat old-fashioned, traditional air to them.

Helenium, L’hélénie

Heleniums are available in a gorgeous array of colours from the brightest of yellows, through varying shades of orange, to dark copper-red. They flower from June through to August but with constant dead-heading they can last well into early autumn.

Helenium whilst loving plenty of sunshine also require moisture. If your soil dries out quickly make sure you incorporate plenty of organic matter when you first plant them, and top them up each spring with more.

Helenium is also known by the common name sneezeweed, a rather lovely name I think, one that originates from the Cherokee Indians who dried the flowers and used them to make a herbal snuff to cure colds and catarrh.

They may feel slightly old-fashioned but like butterflies, bees and other pollinators I love Helenium. Last year I planted my own swathes of the perennial throughout my hot border, and this year they have been bustling with activity!

Helenium, L’hélénie

 

Helenium, L’hélénie

To prolong the life of Helenium, dead-head them when the flowers begin to fade by cutting the flower and its stem down to a lateral flower bud or leaf.

Dead-heading Helenium

If you have Helenium growing in your garden, I’d love to know, please do leave your comments in the box below

A bientôt

Katherine x


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'Plant Guides: Helenium' have 1 comment

  1. October 3, 2017 @ 4:03 pm My top 8 Gardening Jobs for October | jardin-perdu

    […] not all doom and gloom though. Sedum, Rudbeckia, Nicotiana, Aster, Dahlia and Helenium continue to add a very welcome splash of colour to my garden and will provide late season nectar […]

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